Question: Why Is It May I Instead Of Can I?

Can I polite?

It isn’t that “may I” is more polite than “can I,” it’s that when you are asking permission to do something, “may I” is grammatically correct.

It isn’t that “may I” is more polite than “can I,” it’s that when you are asking permission to do something, “may I” is grammatically correct..

Can I ask you or may I ask you?

May I ask you a question? Asking for permission. In addition, “may” version is more polite than the “can” version. Realistically speaking, both ask for permission and neither is offensive, but yes, “may” is still more polite than “can.”

Can and could grammar?

We use can and can’t to talk about the ability to do something at a specific time in the present or future: I can see you. … We use could and couldn’t to talk about the past: She could speak several languages.

How do you ask for something nicely?

Use “WOULD YOU DO ME A FAVOR.” This is often used and you must use it when you are asking for a special request or favor. Other phrases for asking something to someone nicely are “DO YOU MIND,” WOULD YOU MIND, COULD I, WOULD IT BE OK IF, WOULD IT BE POSSIBLE, WOULD YOU BE WILLING TO, etc.

What type of verb is May?

Helping verbs or auxiliary verbs such as will, shall, may, might, can, could, must, ought to, should, would, used to, need are used in conjunction with main verbs to express shades of time and mood. The combination of helping verbs with main verbs creates what are called verb phrases or verb strings.

Can I go to the bathroom vs May I?

The “joke” here is based on the insistence that you should use may when asking for permission to do something, and can when speaking about ability. By this logic, the student should have said “May I go to the bathroom?” since their ability to use the facilities is likely not in question.

What is the difference between will and can?

Will vs Can The auxiliary verb ‘will’ is used primarily in the future tense. On the other hand, the verb ‘can’ is used in the sense of ‘ability’. In other words, the verb ‘can’ indicates ‘ability’, but it does not indicate future tense as ‘will’ does. This is the main difference between the two words.

Is May you correct grammar?

May you isn’t automatically incorrect. “May you live in interesting times,” expresses the wish that the person being addressed live in interesting times. But this is not usually what people mean when they say may you. May you is usually used in the sense of may I, but may I is asking for permission.

Can polite request example?

Do you think you could…? to sound more polite. Remember that ‘Do you mind…?’ and ‘Would you mind…?’ mean ‘Is it a problem for you?’…Choose the correct alternative for the following:_ I borrow a pen, please? … ‘I’ve forgotten my wallet. … _ you like to come to the cinema tonight? … Do you mind _ the window please?More items…•

Where to Use May I?

If you use “May I…” then you are asking permission to use the book and bring it back at a later time. Therefore you would hopefully say that “May I…” is the correct choice here. Your ability is assumed, so you really just want to ask permission.

When to say may I?

When making a request using may, only I can be the subject. If you are making a formal request to dance with someone, you would say, “May I have this dance?” not “May you have this dance?” May followed by you does not express a request; it expresses a wish, as in “May you live long.”

Would and will in the same sentence?

The word would does not have a tense, but will is always future tense. Because of this, it is necessary to change got to get , which is future tense. Your second example is perfectly normal: there is no connection between the uses of will and would in the two clauses.

How do I ask for permission?

Asking for permissioncould is more formal and polite than can:may is another more formal and polite way of asking for permission:may is a more formal and polite way of giving permission:may is a more formal and polite way of saying that someone has permission:

Can I please or could I please?

“Could” is the polite form of “can”—so both are correct, but we use them in different situations. We use “can” when we are telling someone to do something. We use “could” when we are making a request. Teacher to students: “Can you please be quiet!”

Would and will use?

Would: How They’re Different (and How to Use Each) The main difference between will and would is that would can be used in the past tense but will cannot. Also, would is commonly used to refer to a future event that may occur under specific conditions, while will is used more generally to refer to future events.

Can I ask you a question if you don’t mind?

You’re asking the listener if he/she doesn’t mind your “asking.” It’s almost as if saying that the person asking the question isn’t the one actually asking it, but the verb itself is the thing asking. “If you don’t mind me asking” This is a more usual way of saying it.

Can I request or request may?

In spoken English, a request for permission is generally answered with can, cannot, or can’t, rather than with may or may not, even if the question was formed using may. (Although mayn’t is a word, it looks and sounds strange even to native speakers.)

How do you use may in a question?

While it is possible to use may to ask for permission or to grant permission, we use will or can when we want to ask someone to do something for us: May I use your telephone? Will you do this for me? Can you do this for me?